LiDAR

Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS)

 

TLS provides detailed and highly accurate 3D data rapidly and efficiently. Applications for terrestrial laser scanners are wide ranging, including Architecture, Road detail surveys, Movement Monitoring, Mining, As-Built Surveying, Monitoring, Civil Engineering and Reverse engineering. This is the most accurate of the survey grade systems. Generally, results are in the 1-5mm range depending on the application. Another hybrid of this system is the “stop and go scanning”. This is where a TLS is mounted on a mobile platform however unlike MLS it still requires the scanner to be stationary for each window of data capture.

 

Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS)

 

(MLS) describes terrestrial data acquisition from moving platforms (e.g. road and off-road vehicles, trains or hi-rail) ideally suited for mobile mapping applications where large datasets are required on linear infrastructure with difficult access requirements. Generally, results are in the 10-100mm range depending on the application.

 

Unmanned Aerial Scanning (UAS) 

 

Utilising high-end unmanned airborne platforms to acquire data in hard-to-reach areas of 10-1,000ha in a cost-effective manner. This technology has only been available in recent years due to the significant reduction in size and weight of the sensors required. This type of data capture is ideal for areas where photogrammetry is not viable due to vegetation cover. Typical applications are Wide Area Mapping, Corridor Mapping, Forestry, Hydraulic modelling and Topography mapping. Generally, results are in the 50-80mm range depending on the application.

 

Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS)

 

ALS is a rapid, highly accurate and efficient method of capturing 3D data of large areas. 1,000ha to 10,000 square kilometres. This type of data capture has been available for general survey capture since the late 1990’s. In this time there has been significant improvement in accuracy and data density. Typical applications are Wide Area Mapping, Corridor Mapping, Forestry, Hydraulic modelling and Topography mapping. Generally, results are in the 10cm to 30cm range depending on the application.

 

All of the above systems can be integrated with imagery capture. Typically used to colour the point cloud or produce orthophotos. These data capture methods can produce large dataset in a short period of time. Specialist viewing platforms are required to view and extract survey data.

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